Imperial Guardian Lion - Chinese Customs

An Imperial Guardian Lion is supposed to have mystic protective powers and can be found in front of such places as temples, imperial palaces, government offices or traditionally in front of homes of high ranking members of society indicating their financial and/ or social status.…

Imperial Guardian Lion Smithsonian Institution

A clock designed as a carved nephrite Chinese Imperial guardian lion and a young lion, the carved lion embellished with black enamel and gold mane and red enamel toenails, with eyes of cabochon emeralds for the large lion and cabochon rubies for the young lion, supporting a circular clock with carved citrine face, rose-cut diamond-set hands in the shape of a dragon and black enameled chapter ring with rose ……

Imperial Guardian Lion Left - HenFeathers

Chinese or Imperial guardian lions are a traditional Chinese architectural ornament. They are also known as stone lions or shishi. They are informally known in colloquial English as lion dogs or Foo dogs. The guardian lion is the bringer of good luck and the protector from evil spirits.…

Imperial guardian lion - The Full Wiki

The lions are traditionally carved from decorative stone, such as marble and granite or cast in bronze or iron. Because of the high cost of these materials and the labor required to produce them, private use of Imperial guardian lions was traditionally reserved for wealthy or elite families.…

Chinese guardian lions - Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia

Chinese guardian lions, known as Shishi (Chinese: 石獅; pinyin: shíshī; literally "stone lion") or Imperial guardian lion, and often called "Foo Dogs" in the West, are a common representation of The lion in pre-modern China. They have traditionally stood in front of Chinese Imperial palaces, Imperial tombs, government offices, temples, and the homes of government officials and the wealthy ...…