Petroleum jelly: Safe for a dry nose? - Mayo Clinic

Petroleum jelly is generally safe to use. Rarely, however, inhaling fat-based substances (lipoids) — such as petroleum jelly or mineral oil — for prolonged periods can cause lung problems. Typically, petroleum jelly applied to the inside of the nostrils drains down the back of the nose with normal nasal secretions and is swallowed. Rarely, small amounts of the jelly can migrate into the windpipe ……

Petroleum Jelly May Not Be As Harmless As You Think ...

Oct 21, 2013 · Petroleum jelly, commonly known by the most popular brandname Vaseline, is a derivative of oil refining. Originally found coating the bottom of oil rigs in the mid-1800s, it's a byproduct of the oil industry and therefore an unsustainable resource (read: not eco-friendly). It's commonly used topically to cure everything from dehydrated, flakey skin to diaper rash.…

Petroleum jelly - Wikipedia

Petroleum jelly can be used to coat corrosion-prone items such as metallic trinkets, non-stainless steel blades, and gun barrels prior to storage as it serves as an excellent and inexpensive water repellent. It is used as an environmentally friendly underwater antifouling coating for motor boats and sailing yachts.…

Petroleum Jelly: Is It Safe to Use as a Lubricant?

While petroleum jelly creates a barrier that can help open wounds heal and protect them from air and bacteria, the same barrier can impede normal skin function, preventing it from “breathing.” It is also harder to remove, even with soap and water, which is why it isn’t recommended as a sexual lubricant. It repels moisture of all kinds.…

Vaseline as Lube: Is It Safe?

May 07, 2018 · Vaseline, or petroleum jelly, is an oil-based ointment. It’s soft, sticky, and smooth. It can also warm easily in your hands. It seems as if Vaseline would make a great lubricant for sex. The truth is, many better options exist.Author: Kimberly Holland…