What does lacrime mean?

The fingerspelling provided here is most commonly used for proper names of people and places; it is also used in some languages for concepts for which no sign is available at that moment. There are obviously specific signs for many words available in sign language...…

lacrime - Wiktionary

lacrime. First-person singular present subjunctive form of lacrimar. Formal second-person singular present subjunctive form of lacrimar. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of lacrimar.…

What does lacrime mean in Italian? - WordHippo

lacrime Find more words! Another word for Opposite of Meaning of Rhymes with Sentences with Find word forms Translate from English Translate to English Words With Friends Scrabble Crossword / Codeword Words starting with Words ending with Words containing exactly Words containing letters Pronounce Find conjugations Find names…

lacrima - Wiktionary

Oct 01, 2019 · lacrima f (genitive lacrimae); first declension. a tear (drop of liquid from crying) Lacrimae arma feminae sunt. Tears are the weapons of a woman. Lacrimae quoque arma viri sunt. Tears are also the weapons of a man.…

lacrime translation English Italian dictionary Reverso

With Reverso you can find the Italian translation, definition or synonym for lacrime and thousands of other words. You can complete the translation of lacrime given by the Italian-English Collins dictionary with other dictionaries: Wikipedia, Lexilogos, Juripole, Sapere, Dizionario-italiano, Freelang, Wordreference, Oxford, Collins dictionaries...…

Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares - Wikipedia

Lachrimæ or seaven teares figured in seaven passionate pavans, with divers other pavans, galliards and allemands, set forth for the lute, viols, or violons, in five parts is a collection of instrumental music composed by John Dowland. It was published by John Windet in London in 1604 when Dowland was employed as lutenist to Christian IV of Denmark.…

Lacrimae rerum - Wikipedia

Lacrimae rerum is the Latin phrase for "tears of things." It derives from Book I, line 462 of the Aeneid, by Roman poet Virgil. Some recent quotations have included rerum lacrimae sunt or sunt lacrimae rerum meaning "there are tears of things."…